What Are Your Priorities for 2011?

As I was cleaning out some files last week, I ran across an article I had saved from the January 2007 Harvard Business Review titled, “What to Ask the Person in the Mirror,” by Robert S. Kaplan.  The sub-head for the article is “There comes a point in your career when the best way to figure out how you’re doing is to step back and ask yourself a few questions.  Having all the answers is less important than knowing what to ask.”  Kaplan goes on to list seven areas where you should ask yourself some questions to make sure you are on track with your performance.

It is a very good article through and through but one pull-quote particularly caught my eye – “The fact is, having 15 priorities is the same as having none at all.”  Wow, what a great way to sum up a major problem for individuals, managers, and organizations.  One of the biggest challenges we find in working with large organizations on their training programs is the inability to prioritize the most important issues.  Instead, there seems to be a tendency to try and include every issue, policy, or exception that may possibly occur during their entire working career in one training program – and it is usually given to them on their first or second day of employment!

Every individual faces the same challenge.  Wouldn’t it be better for you to focus on three or four top priorities in 2011 and ensure you get those accomplished than to focus on 15, 20, or more and fail at all of them?  A summary of all seven areas that Kaplan suggests you interrogate yourself on can be found here, but I’d suggest a read through this entire article that can be purchased here.

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